Beagle

Beagle

Beagle hunts in packs. Packs of hunting hounds were being used in England long before the time of the Roman invasion. However, exactly what those hounds were is unknown, although they are thought to be the distant ancestors of the scenthounds that developed later, one of which was the Beagle. When fox hunting became popular in England in the mid-1800s, the Foxhound was developed, and one of its ancestors was said to be the Beagle.

Beagles make a lot of noise – make sure you know the breed before you get one.

Beagles are small dogs, compact and lean, with wonderfully expressive faces, large dropped ears, and dark eyes. The short coat, often tricolored with red or tan, a black saddle, and white on the legs, belly, and muzzle, is soft to the touch. As a hunting scenthound, the Beagle is strong and able to follow a trail for hours at a time. Beagles have two height categories. The smaller ones are under 13 inches at the shoulder, and the larger are over 13 but not exceeding 15 inches.

Beagles

Grooming is not difficult; the short coat can be brushed once or twice a week with a soft bristle brush or curry comb. The short coat does shed, although not heavily. The dropped ears should be checked often, as they can get dirty. The Beagle requires daily exercise. A long, brisk walk is sufficient, although these dogs also enjoy a good run. Beagles should not be allowed to run free outside of a securely fenced yard, as they can be easily distracted by any scents they detect. Even welltrained Beagles will ignore a Come command in favor of following an interesting scent trail.

Training should definitely be a part of every Beagle’s upbringing. Although Beagles by nature are social pack dogs, they still need to learn household manners. Plus, learning to walk nicely on leash can be a challenge; Beagles love to forge ahead with their noses to the ground! However, fair yet structured training that keeps things fun can help Beagles learn basic obedience skills. Beagles are first and foremost hunting hounds. Their sense of smell is their most important sense, and they will follow it anywhere. Packs of Beagles today compete in hunt tests very successfully.

Although their good-natured, friendly temperament makes them appealing family dogs, unless you understand the hound personality, you may be frustrated by them. Hounds can be quite independent, and being with people will never be as exciting as following the scent of a rabbit. In families where they are understood, Beagles can be wonderful pets. They are sturdy and make great playmates for kids. They are clean, do not have a doggy odor, and do not mind spending time outside. As hunting hounds, they do bay, and not all neighbors appreciate their melody!

Beagles should not be trusted alone with small pets (they are hunters!), although they are very social with other dogs. Beagles are, unfortunately, prone to several serious health problems, including hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, dwarfism, seizure disorders, knee problems, and reproductive disorders.

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External Links: wiki ; akc ; odp

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  1. Beagle characteristics says:

    Beagles were developed as hunting dogs and they have many hunting dog behaviours in their genes. There are many Beagles who are aggressive, fearful, or neurotic. If you’re considering a Beagle puppy, you need to look carefully at the temperament of both parents, and if you’re considering a Beagle adult dog, you need to temperament-test him before bringing him home. Providing enough exercise. Beagles don’t need to run for miles, but they do need more exercise than the typical amble around the block that many owners give them. Beagles who don’t get enough exercise not only become bored, destructive, and noisy, but also obese, which puts stress on their joints and causes more health problems. Beagles must have regular opportunities to stretch their legs and vent their energy, if you want them to remain healthy and fit. Beagles are scenthounds, which means they will follow their nose wherever it leads them. You cannot trust these dogs off-leash. They will take off – oblivious to your frantic shouts – after anything that runs.

    Many Beagles are clever escape artists who will go over or under fences in search of adventure. You may need higher fences than you might imagine for their small size. They can climb chain link. You may also need to sink wire into the ground along the fence line to thwart digging. Gates should have the highest quality locks, as some Beagles can open flimsy latches.

    Beagles can be slow about this. Read more on housebreaking your Beagle.

    Beagles should never be left outside in your yard, unsupervised. Their mournful baying and howling will have your neighbors calling the cops to report the nuisance, or quietly letting your Beagle out of his yard so he’ll wander away and stop disturbing them.

    For such a shorthaired dog, Beagles shed much more than you might think – on the high side of average. In addition, like all scenthounds, Beagles have a distinct doggy odor.

    Finding a healthy one and keeping him healthy. Many Beagles live a good long life, but unfortunately they are very prone to health problems, including itchy skin conditions, ear infections, a long list of eye disease, joint problems, hypothyroidism, diabetes, epilepsy, and heart disease. To avoid health problems, buy your Beagle from the right breeder. And once you have your puppy home, you need to keep him healthy, starting with feeding the best foods.

    Beagles are not easy to train because they are independent thinkers who don’t particularly care about pleasing you. You must show your Beagle, through absolute consistency, that you mean what you say.

  2. Beagle shedding says:

    For such a shorthaired dog, Beagles shed much more than you might think – on the high side of average. In addition, like all scenthounds, Beagles have a distinct doggy odor.

  3. My Beagle says:

    Only if you’re planning on walking and walking and walking will a beagle work for you. And be sure your neighbours are forewarned; there are several beagles in our neighbourhood and you can hear their howls blocks away. Lucky for them they are so adorable! Miles was very good with children and never, ever nipped or growled at them. I would recommend a Beagle for any active family that is dedicated to exercising daily.

    I was at the dog shelter purchasing food for my Cairn, and someone mentioned a Beagle puppy just being brought in. I dashed back to see him (only 7 weeks old!) and claimed him as mine. He had only been brought in 2 hours earlier, and hadn’t even been processed. I brought him home that night and he was attached to me until he passed away last year. The previous owners claimed they were moving and couldn’t keep him, but I doubt this was true. I think it was because he was so NOISY! Very verbal guy – always commenting on everything and anything!!

    Miles was the most affectionate dog I’ve ever owned. Although he howled when we’d leave the house, all of the neighbours loved him so much that they didn’t mind. One of them even kept a box of biscuits, and would dole them out to him when he couldn’t stop on his own. He was a bit overweight, as most Beagles are, but was running in the park the day before he passed away. He had problems with fatty lumps as he aged, but never missed a meal!

  4. Pepper says:

    I have cute little beagle named Pepper.She always makes mess,chews stuff. never ever listen to anything that i have to say.She loves food. I think sometimes she even dreams about food.Food is her world. Are all beagles this obstinate?

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Beagle